Teens

Vote Now: 2014 Official Teens' Top Ten Nominees

Voting is now open for Teens' Top Ten! Voting is open to EVERYONE!

Vote between now and Teen Read Week at www.ala.org/yalsa/reads4teens in order to vote for your favorites. You can vote for up to 3 titles. The winners will be announced the week after Teen Read Week on October 20, 2014.

Here are the nominees:

My votes went to: Splintered (A.G. Howard), Eleanor and Park (Rainbow Rowell), and Monument 14: Sky on Fire (Emmy Laybourne).

Who will you vote for?

Next Japan Otaku Day!

We’ll be learning about katakana, one of the building blocks that makes up the Japanese language. If you’ve ever read your favorite manga (for me it's Watamore!) and you’ve wondered why the action sounds —also known as an onomatopoeia—were written in Japanese differently than the regular hiragana, or what part of Japanese they write non-Japanese names, now you know it's Katakana. Katakana is a part of the Japanese written language used for foreign words and names, to show emphasis, or for onomatopoeias.       

                                     

(An example of Katakana used to express an onomatopoeia from the horror mangaParasyte)

(Picture from Mangareader.com)

As mentioned above, katakana is used to write out non-Japanese words and/or names. For example my name, Amina Doctrove, in katakana would be written as アミナ ドルトロバ, another example is for the lead character from Attack on Titan, Eren Jaeger, (also written as Yeager) in Katakana would be  エレン イェ—ガ—.

(Image via FUNimation)

Learning katakana isn't that much harder than learning hiragana, which used for native Japanese words and names. Don't worry if you're unfamiliar with anything about the Japanese language, the most important thing about Katakana is that it's written a lot sharper than hiragana and is used for foreign words and names. One of the activities for this month's Japan Day is for us to practice writing out our names in Katakana!

The anime this month is Wolf Children (2012) directed by Mamoru Hosoda, the same mind that brought you Summer Wars (2009). Fans of the anime Spice and Wolf will love the story of a young mother by the name of Hana who one day finds herself alone in the world caring for two half-wolf/half-human children. While Wolf Children is much different in tone than Summer Wars, it's still full of heart and a wonderful film about motherhood, identity, and finding one's place in the world.

Of course at the end of every Japan Otaku Day we do a giveaway for some awesome anime and manga-related prizes, join us and stick around until the very end!

Japan Otaku Day will be next Saturday August 30 from 2 p.m. to 5:30.

I hope to see you all there!

Written by Amina D., YTC Intern

8/26/2014 Add a Comment Share this: